Ideas for action during a challenging time for our environment.

 

 

Without federal clean energy leadership, local governments will need to pick up the slack.

There’s a lot unfolding in Washington, D.C., right now, and you may be wondering: “What can I do to voice my concerns?”

It’s International River Otter Awareness Day! Here are five reasons we appreciate these amazing creatures.

Global warming is taking its toll on people and the environment around the world. Here in the U.S., we see more extreme weather like heat waves, droughts, floods, and bad air days because of global warming. We know that to avoid catastrophe and meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement, the US will need to cut overall global warming pollution by more than 80 percent by mid-century.

Professor Hughes recalls his reaction to finding that 93 percent of the Great Barrier Reef’s coral is bleached: “And then we wept.”

April 22 is a big day for climate action! This Earth Day marks the historical event when more than 150 countries will come together to sign the first-ever legally binding global climate deal -- The Paris Climate Agreement.

 | by
John Rumpler
Senior Director, Clean Water for America Campaign and Senior Attorney

Why do we need federal protection under the Clean Water Act if there are also state laws designed to protect our rivers and streams? The answer is that, all too often, state officials fail to enforce their own laws or side with politically-powerful polluters.

Rivers and streams are the arteries and veins of our land and communities, few things have impacted our rivers more than dams. The hydropower industry is right now making an unprecedented assault on our rivers and wildlife. If they’re successful, they’ll take the nation back more than half a century to the regrettable time when dams could destroy our rivers without consequence.